Analyzing Office 365 Photo EXIF data using Power BI

by Welcome to Marquee Insights

In an earlier post, I wrote about how to mine the OCR data from Office 365 document folders using Power BI. During the research for that post I discovered that the photo EXIF data is also available for analysis from Office 365. I’ll show you how to get to it in this post.

What is EXIF data anyway?

Think of EXIF as special metadata for photos and with today’s cameras, records the settings of the camera as well as the location it was taken, if the camera has GPS. You can read more about the format here: https://photographylife.com/what-is-exif-data  Many smart phones today automatically include the EXIF data when you take photos with your phone. This data is automatically extracted by Office 365 from photos when uploaded to a document library.

Why do I care about this?

Imagine you work for a company that does inspections. Your inspectors use their phone to take photos of issues already. Wouldn’t it be great to show the photos by location and related location data together on a report page? This technique allows you to easily mine that EXIF data.

How do I get to it?

First, upload your images to a SharePoint document folder in Office 365 and the OCR process will initiate  automatically. I’ve had it take up to 15 minutes to process so you may need to be patient. You can do this via SharePoint Mobile app if you are uploading mobile photos.

Second, from Power BI desktop, connect to the document folder using the SharePoint Online List connector. By doing so, you’ll get access to the correct column that contains the EXIF data. Once in the dataset, you can use Power Query M to parse the data and start analyzing.

Demo

In this video, I’ll show you how to access the EXIF data and what you can do with the data.

Here’s the Power Query M Code

let
Source = SharePoint.Tables(“https://YourInstance/YourSite”, [ApiVersion = 15]),
#”8d19b1eb-42b8-4843-b721-fc1e8ef47688″ = Source{[Id=”88888888-8888-8888-8888-888888888888″]}[Items],
#”Renamed Columns” = Table.RenameColumns(#”8d19b1eb-42b8-4843-b721-fc1e8ef47688″,{{“ID”, “ID.1”}}),
#”Filtered Rows” = Table.SelectRows(#”Renamed Columns”, each [MediaServiceAutoTags] <> null and [Created] >= #datetime(2019, 4, 19, 0, 0, 0)),
#”Expanded FirstUniqueAncestorSecurableObject” = Table.ExpandRecordColumn(#”Filtered Rows”, “FirstUniqueAncestorSecurableObject”, {“Url”}, {“FirstUniqueAncestorSecurableObject.Url”}),
#”Removed Other Columns” = Table.SelectColumns(#”Expanded FirstUniqueAncestorSecurableObject”,{“FirstUniqueAncestorSecurableObject.Url”, “File”, “Properties”}),
#”Expanded File” = Table.ExpandRecordColumn(#”Removed Other Columns”, “File”, {“Name”, “ServerRelativeUrl”, “TimeCreated”, “TimeLastModified”}, {“File.Name”, “File.ServerRelativeUrl”, “File.TimeCreated”, “File.TimeLastModified”}),
#”Merged Columns” = Table.CombineColumns(#”Expanded File”,{“FirstUniqueAncestorSecurableObject.Url”, “File.ServerRelativeUrl”},Combiner.CombineTextByDelimiter(“”, QuoteStyle.None),”Picture URL”),
#”Expanded Properties” = Table.ExpandRecordColumn(#”Merged Columns”, “Properties”, {“vti_mediaservicemetadata”}, {“Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata”}),
#”Parsed JSON” = Table.TransformColumns(#”Expanded Properties”,{{“Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata”, Json.Document}}),
#”Expanded Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata” = Table.ExpandRecordColumn(#”Parsed JSON”, “Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata”, {“address”, “location”}, {“Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata.address”, “Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata.location”}),
#”Expanded Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata.location” = Table.ExpandRecordColumn(#”Expanded Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata”, “Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata.location”, {“altitude”, “latitude”, “longitude”}, {“Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata.location.altitude”, “Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata.location.latitude”, “Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata.location.longitude”}),
#”Expanded Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata.address” = Table.ExpandRecordColumn(#”Expanded Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata.location”, “Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata.address”, {“City”, “State”, “Country”, “EnglishAddress”}, {“Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata.address.City”, “Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata.address.State”, “Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata.address.Country”, “Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata.address.EnglishAddress”}),
#”Changed Type” = Table.TransformColumnTypes(#”Expanded Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata.address”,{{“File.Name”, type text}, {“Picture URL”, type text}, {“File.TimeCreated”, type datetime}, {“File.TimeLastModified”, type datetime}, {“Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata.address.City”, type text}, {“Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata.address.State”, type text}, {“Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata.address.Country”, type text}, {“Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata.address.EnglishAddress”, type text}, {“Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata.location.altitude”, type number}, {“Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata.location.latitude”, type number}, {“Properties.vti_mediaservicemetadata.location.longitude”, type number}})
in
#”Changed Type”

One Response to “Analyzing Office 365 Photo EXIF data using Power BI”

April 22, 2019 at 9:32 am, Power BI Paginated, DAX, Power Query and more... (April 22, 2019) | Guy in a Cube said:

[…] Analyzing Office 365 Photo EXIF data using Power BI (@tgatte) […]

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